Two scientists share Nobel Physics Prize for neutrino insights



    Two scientists share Nobel Physics Prize for neutrino insights

    Oct.7, Tokyo: Nobel Prize in Physics for the year 2015 has been awarded to Japanese and a Canadian scientist for their work on tiny puzzling subatomic particles known as neutrinos. They will share the $960,000 prize.

    Neutrinos are the second most bountiful particles after photons, the particles of light, with trillions of them streaming through our bodies every second, but their true nature has been poorly understood.

    Japanese Takaaki Kajita did early work on the tiny particles at a purpose-built underground laboratory a kilometer beneath a mountain in central Japan.

    Canadian Arthur McDonald work at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory demonstrated that neutrinos from the Sun don't disappear on their way to Earth, but change form instead.

    Together their work overturned the prevailing theory that neutrinos have no mass, and has forced physicists to reconsider the fundamental make-up of the universe.

    The Oslo Times